NSA-Fan Feinstein Slams CIA Spying And Intimidation

Having been vociferous over her support for the NSA’s domestic espionage programs, we couldn’t help but see the ironic hypocrisy of Senator Diane Feinstein’s accusations that the CIA secretly removed documents from computers used by her panel to investigate a controversial interrogation program. As WaPo reports, Feinstein “is not taking lightly” the fact that the CIA appears to have violated the Fourth Amendment, which bars unreasonable searches and seizures, as well as various federal laws and a presidential executive order that prevents the agency from conducting domestic searches and surveillance. President Obama has since expressed “great confidence” in CIA chief John Brennan (unless of course he crossed a red line).

The irony and hypocrisy begins… (Via WaPo),

The head of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday sharply accused the CIA of violating federal law and undermining the constitutional principle of congressional oversight as she detailed publicly for the first time how the agency secretly removed documents from computers used by her panel to investigate a controversial interrogation program.

 

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) said that the situation amounted to attempted intimidation of congressional investigators, adding: “I am not taking it lightly.”

 

 

She confirmed that an internal agency investigation of the action has been referred to the Justice Department for possible criminal prosecution. And she said that the CIA appears to have violated the Fourth Amendment, which bars unreasonable searches and seizures, as well as various federal laws and a presidential executive order that prevents the agency from conducting domestic searches and surveillance.

 

She has sought an apology and recognition that the CIA search of the committee’s computers was inappropriate, she said. “I have received neither,” she added.

CIA chief Brennan is defending his agency’s role:

the agency did nothing wrong and “has tried to work as collaboratively as possible” with the Senate committee. He said he would defer to a Justice Department investigation and wait for the facts to come out.

 

Brennan said he wants any historical record of the program to be accurate and balanced and said the CIA was not trying to thwart its progression or release.

 

“The CIA agrees with many findings in the report and disagrees with others,” he said.

 

Asked if he would resign if the CIA was found to be in the wrong, Brennan said he would let the president decide his fate.

 

“If I did something wrong, I will go to the president,” the CIA director said. “He is the one who can ask me to stay or to go.”

And in response to this:

  • WHITE HOUSE SAYS PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA HAS “GREAT CONFIDENCE” IN CIA CHIEF JOHN BRENNAN EVEN AS KEY SENATOR ACCUSES AGENCY OF SPYING ON CONGRESS

    



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